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Ik ben verslaafd aan boeken. Hieronder kan je mijn volledige lijst vinden van gelezen fictie-boeken die in mijn boekenkast. Van sommige boeken kan je zelfs een korte bespreking vinden.
Carpe Jugulum

Carpe Jugulum

Auteur

Terry Pratchett

Eerste Uitgave

1998

Uitgave

1999

Uitgeverij

HarperPrism

Vorm

roman

Taal

Engels

Bladzijden

296 bladzijden

Gelezen

2007-03-11

Score

8/10

Inhoud

It is rare and splendid event when an author is elevated from the underground into the international literary establishment. In the case of England's best-known and best-loved modern satirist, that event has been long overdue.
Terry Pratchett's profoundly irreverent Discworld novels satirize and celebrate every aspect of life, modern and ancient, sacred and profane. Consistent number-one bestsellers in England, they have garnered him a secure position in the pantheon of humor along with Mark Twain, Douglas Adams, Matt Groening, and Jonathan Swift.
Even so distinguished an author as A. S. Byatt has sung his praises, calling Pratchett's intricate and delightful fictional Discworld more complicated and satisfying than Oz.
His latest satiric triumph, Carpe Jugulum, involves an exclusive royal snafu that leads to comic mayhem. In a fit of enlightenment democracy and ebullient goodwill, King Verence invites Uberwald's undead, the Magpyrs, into Lancre to celebrate the birth of his daughter. But once ensconced within the castle, these wine-drinking, garlic-eating, sun-loving modern vampires have no intention of leaving. Ever.
Only an uneasy alliance between a nervous young priest and the argumentative local witches can save the country from being taken over by people with a cultivated bloodlust and bad taste in silk waistcoats. For them, there's only one way to fight.
Go for the throat, or as the vampyres themselves say...

Bespreking

A great Discworld novel to set your teeth in

You can say a lot about King Verence, ruler of the kingdom of Lancre, but one is unlikely to claim that his policies are not liberal enough. He is not only married to the beautiful witch Magrat, but he even finds inviting the people from Uberwald to his baby shower a very, good idea. And this would indeed have been a nice gesture of peace, if it was not for the fact that the invitees are actual Vampyres (that do not know how to spell). Everyone knows that inviting Vampyres to your country will lead to not much good. Luckily the witches Nanny, Perdita and Agnes are there to safe the day (again). But what in Om's name happened to Granny Weatherwax?

Carpe Jugulum is already the 23rd instalment of the immensely popular Discworld series and still Terry Pratchett seems far from loosing his magical touch. Like always the plot is not the main attraction of a Discworld novel, but the crazy characters surely are. The central cast this time is given to Granny Weatherwax and her fellow witches, but very early in the story they are pushed aside by the other characters. Igor, the coachman who stitches on body parts if the need arises, and Scraps, his dog made out off -you guessed- scarps, will both play a central role in the story. The Magpyr family of Vampyres, proves that an identity crisis can turn out to be fatal, even for immortals. But also the many other characters make Carpe Jugulum a rich and funny story.

As an extra treat Terry has introduced Mightily-Praiseworthy-Are-Ye-Who-Exalteth-Om Oats, the Omnian priest. When faced with the immeasurable power of the Vampyres, Mightily Oats starts to doubt his own believes. This gives Terry ample opportunities to squeeze in some tongue-in-cheek remarks on how we deal ourselves with religion. Knowing that Terry himself is a true non-believer this leads to one of the most hilarious philosophical discussions ever to occur in the Discworld and beyond.